Kohima Nagaland

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Kohima is the hilly capital city of India's north eastern state of Nagaland. With a resident population of 99,039 it is the second largest city in the state. Originally known as Kewhira, it was founded in 1878 when the British Empire established its headquarters of the then Naga Hills. It officially became the capital after the state of Nagaland was inaugurated in 1963.

Kohima is the land of the Angami Naga tribe. It is situated in the foothills of Japfu range located south of Kohima District (25.67°N 94.12°E)[2] and has an average elevation of 1261 metres (4137 feet)

Kohima was originally known as Kewhira. The name, Kohima, was officially given by the British as they could not pronounce the Angami name of Kewhira (Tenyidie for "the land where the flower Kewhi grows"). It is called after the wild flowering plant Kewhi, found in the mountains. Most local people prefer to use 'Kewhira'.

Kohima was originally a large village named Kewhira, which is located in the North-Eastern part of the present day Kohima urban area. The village is divided into four Thinuos namely - Tsütuonuomia, Lhisemia, Dapfütsumia and Pfuchatsumia. They are termed shortly as T, L, D, and P Khel respectively.

The British incursions into the Naga territory, beginning in the 1840s, met with stiff resistance from the independence-loving Nagas, who had never been conquered by any empire before. The stiffness of the resistance can be gauged by the fact that it took nearly four decades for the British to conquer a territory that is less than 10,000 square kilometres (the eastern region was left free). Kohima was the first seat of modern administration as the Headquarters of Naga Hills District (then under Assam) with the appointment of Guybon Henry Damant as Political Officer in 1879. When Nagaland became a full-fledged state on 1 December 1963, Kohima was christened as the state capital.

Kohima lies north of the Japfü Barail intersection. Due to its elevation, Kohima features a more moderate version of a humid subtropical climate (Cwa). Kohima has cool winters and hot very rainy summers. The coldest months are from December to February, when frost occurs and in the higher altitudes snowfall occurs occasionally. During the height of summers, from June–August, temperature ranges an average of 27–32 °C (80–90 °F). Heavy rainfall occurs during summer.

History


The mined tennis court and terraces of the District Commissioner's bungalow in Kohima. In 1944 during World War II the Battle of Kohima along with the simultaneous Battle of Imphal was the turning point in the Burma Campaign. For the first time in South-East Asia the Japanese lost the initiative to the Allies which they then retained until the end of the war. This hand-to-hand battle and slaughter prevented the Japanese from gaining a high base from which they might next roll across the extensive flatlands of India.

Kohima has a large cemetery known as the War Cemetery in Kohima for the Allied war dead maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. The cemetery lies on the slopes of Garrison Hill, in what was once the Deputy Commissioner's tennis court which was the scene of intense fighting, the Battle of the Tennis Court. The epitaph carved on the memorial of the 2nd British Division in the cemetery

When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say,For Your Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today has become world-famous as the Kohima poem. The verse is attributed to John Maxwell Edmonds (1875–1958), and is thought to have been inspired by the epitaph written by Simonides to honour the Greek who fell at the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC


state Nagaland
Country India
Area 20 km2 (8 sq mi)
Languages English
Currency Ruppee

Kohima War Cemetery

KOHIMA WAR CEMETERY lies on the battle ground of Garrison Hill. No trace remains of the bungalow.

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which was destroyed in the fighting, but white concrete lines mark and preserve permanently the historic tennis court. The cemetery now contains 1,420 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. At the highest point in the cemetery stands the KOHIMA CREMATION MEMORIAL commemorating 917 Hindu and Sikh soldiers whose remains were cremated in accordance with their faith.

Naga Heritage Village

The concept is superb. The event is very popular. The local enthusiasm is truly superb.....but alas, it does not attract 365 days

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In addition to a central stadium for performing arts fully supplemented with VIP & Visitors galleries; every participant group is housed in the specified fully operational living space which has been aesthetically designed as per structures & fine detailing traditionally prevalent in the said region of Nagaland.

Catholic Church

It is also known as the highest numbers of membership fees collected among all the churches in kohima

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A member of the church as to pay at least 4 different membership fees apart from other different collections. A new rule has been made for the members, that whoever fails to pay his/her 10 tithes,the priest shall not perform funeral rites for those members.

Japfu Peak‎

Japfu is the second highest peak of Nagaland. Here I am going to discuss about a few points, involving the time and how to climb. .

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1. When to go- The best time to do this treacherous trek, is winter i.e March to April or may be May. But never ever attempt it in the monsoon.
2. How to go- Reach Kigwema, a small village just 18km away from Kohima. Start the hike leaving behind Japfu Christian Collage.
3. Guide?- Its a hike, where guide is a must in the checklist. Nephrezo is the most dependable person there to guide you way up.

Kohima Zoo

This zoo is no more! Visited years back when I was a kid and it was a good small zoo but, not anymore.

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This zoo is no more! Visited years back when I was a kid and it was a good small zoo but, not anymore. If you happen to be reading this then your hopes of a zoo visitation were long crushed and eaten away by the spirits of all those wild animals and birds who once lived a short life here on this Kohima Zoo.

Khonoma Village

Khonoma deserves a couple of your days, much more than ugly Kohima or uninspiring Kigwema. I wish I had stayed there the whole time I had in southern Nagaland and gone also up to Dzuleke (the only way to get there is through Khonoma appartently).

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I wish I had stayed there the whole time I had in southern Nagaland and gone also up to Dzuleke (the only way to get there is through Khonoma appartently). You can stroll around the village, walk down in the rice fields, or up to the alder tree area. It is peaceful and relaxing, even when wet! There are only a couple of homestays, I stayed at Pier's Vantage HS, with friendly Apeno & family, which I absolutely recommend. Simple rooms (each with private bathroom) are upstairs, the family lives downstairs, and you can have your meals in their big kitchen. There is a little balcony in front of one of the rooms where you can just sit, read, and watch the rice fields. Apeno's husband is involved in the nature conservation trust so he call tell you quite a lot about the eco-policy implemented in this village, a pearl in deforested Nagaland.

Enthralling Cuisine

Latest News: Must Visit Eateries in Kohima Located in south of China and northern side of Myanmar.

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Located in south of China and northern side of Myanmar, Nagaland is a state known as much for its tribes, traditions as much for its mouthwatering cuisine. There are more than a dozen tribes in Nagaland and each has its unique yet similar practices and customs. While a lot of people associate Naga cuisine with just pork based dishes, it is much more than that! In fact, in Nagaland, you will be able to savor a wide range of culinary delights covering items like rice, chicken, vegetables, pork and spicy chilli sauces.

Lunch

How to get there: Khonoma is about an hour from Kohima and can be accessed by road.

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How to get there: Khonoma is about an hour from Kohima and can be accessed by road. There is one daily local shared taxi that leaves around 1pm from TCP Junction, and returns the next day. This is a good option if you plan to spend the night in the village. If not it is better to hire your own taxi for the day and make a day trip out of it.

Rich culture, vibrant tradition

Rich culture, vibrant traditions, colourful festivals and food so unique.

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Rich culture, vibrant traditions, colourful festivals and food so unique, it is nothing short of a culinary adventure – that's Nagaland for you. Northeast India is easily one of the country's least explored regions and only a few (apart from the locals) are aware of the expanse of experiences on offer here, especially when it comes to gastronomical pleasures.

Bamboo Steamed Fish

The first bite of Nagaland’s signature bamboo steamed fish might be a bit bland for your taste buds.

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The first bite of Nagaland’s signature bamboo steamed fish might be a bit bland for your taste buds. However, the subtle flavour of the bamboo slowly kicks in and leads to an explosion of flavours. This is a very simple yet popular dish that can be found on almost every dinner table in Nagaland. The bamboo steamed fish is cooked in less spices and is best enjoyed with steamed rice.

Rongmei cabbage curry with pork fat

If there’s one place in India that can offer a vegetable curry cooked in pork fat.

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If there’s one place in India that can offer a vegetable curry cooked in pork fat, it has to be Nagaland. The Nagas add a unique non-vegetarian twist to the local favourite rongmei cauliflower curry by cooking the delicacy in pork fat which makes it a unique binding agent and gives the dish a one-of-a-kind taste. Also, like most Naga dishes, this one too has a generous dose of chillies and garlic, giving it a solid kick but balancing off well when served with hot chapatis.